Block Scheduling

The dawn of the 2012-13 school year brought with it a change in Trinity’s daily schedule. Following an exhaustive five-year study, the school embarked on the year employing a more collegiate class block schedule that perfectly fits the needs of a 21st century high school student.

Reasons why we know “Block” is best

1. Block encourages innovation and deeper learning.

Classes are taught at the right pace: teachers present a concept, students actively do something to learn the concept and then teachers reinforce the concept.  Research shows this is the most successful way to learn and is best suited for young men.  Because students and teachers have more time together when they meet, creative lessons demanding critical thinking skills have become the norm.  This type of learning can’t be done in 45 minutes.  Hands-on-activities = deeper learning.

2. Block means more rigor, which means higher standardized test scores and better preparation.

Trinity requires more courses to graduate than any other high school in Kentucky.   Since moving to block scheduling, our students’ achievement has risen.  The Class of 2018 set a new school record for the highest composite on their ACT.  High test scores = acceptance to more colleges + merit scholarships + demonstrated preparation for college.  Students also have greater access to elective classes in music, art, journalism, information technology and the humanities.  Many of our students take a fifth year of science, math and world languages.

3. Block better prepares students to be better organized for college.

A student’s class schedule is like college. He learns how to organize his studying and do more long term projects. Doing homework for 4 classes the next day is more reasonable than preparing for 6 or 7 classes.  More time to learn the concept and more time to do homework = higher student achievement.  Block allows us to have 3 advising periods each week when students meet with a teacher/advisor in small groups.  It is time to go seek help from a teacher, make-up a test if absent, or visit the library, technology center or lab.

4. We are enjoying record low average class sizes and more individual attention for every student.

Our teachers see on average only 60 students per day.  Fewer students each day = more individual attention.  Freshman take a class that successfully launches them into high school, both academically and socially.  Seniors take a course that readies them for the move to greater independence once high school concludes.  A more holistic approach = better balanced young men.

 

What students are saying about block:

“Block scheduling has allowed me access to multiple AP classes and the ability to balance my workload with sports.”
Grant Brunstetter  ’19
“I love block schedule because with only 4 classes a day its easier to schedule my classwork and extra-curricular activities.”
Porter Hunt ’20
“In block scheduling I have time during Advising to meet with teachers, ask questions and get extra help when needed.”
Will Kempf ’20

What teachers are saying about block:

 

“Because of the extended time for group activities, I’ve been able to engage students that were quiet and shy in class before. No one gets left out or behind.”
Keith Rapp, Social Studies
“The block schedule allows students to have a deeper, better grasp of the material because they can approach it from different angles, varied perspectives and through different means. In the process, we are able to serve young men of wide-ranging learning styles better.”
Blake Napper, Social Studies
“The block schedule provides students with a collegiate atmosphere, one that allows for introduction of a concept in conjunction with reinforcing activities – all within a single period.” 
Tony Lococo H’03, English

House News

The Trinity Brotherhood: How the many become one

Pictured are the 13 Trinity students who were recognized by the National Merit Corporation. First row (sitting L – R): Nicholas Pesce, Jackson McClellan, Logan Thomas, Edward Harbold, Nick Huls, Hunter Ruckriegel Second row (standing L – R): John McCalpin, Bryce...

Trinity Hosts Living Rosary Event

Trinity was honored to welcome The Marian Committee and the community to the 68th Annual Living Rosary, hosted in Steinhauser Gym this past weekend. Children in the community formed the shape of the Rosary on the gym floor, and were joined by hundreds of people in...

Trinity Alumnus to Help in Centre College Presidential Search

Henry Snyder, Trinity Class of 2016, has had quite the senior year at Centre College. As a member of the Greek community, he sits on the executive committee of Centre’s chapter of Beta Theta Pi. Snyder also works closely with the Admission Office to provide campus...

Trinity Golf Rocks Capture KHSAA Region 6 Championship!

Your Trinity Golf Rocks are headed to state! Led by the defending Kentucky Boys High School Champion, JM Butler, the Golf Rocks set a school-record in posting an 11 under-par and winning the KHSAA 6th Region Championship! The Rocks started strong and never looked back...

Trinity Senior Earns Eagle Scout

Your Trinity Golf Rocks are headed to state! Led by the defending Kentucky Boys High School Champion, JM Butler, the Golf Rocks set a school-record in posting an 11 under-par and winning the KHSAA 6th Region Championship! The Rocks started strong and never looked back...

Admissions News

Trinity Future Rock Night – Friday, Oct. 25!

Trinity Future Rock Night – Friday, Oct. 25!

Join us for Future Rock Night and a special poster signing after the game where you get to meet the Rocks football team! Friday, Oct. 25 at Trinity's Marshall Stadium is Future Rocks Night. The Rocks take on the Eastern Eagles at 7:30 p.m. and stick around after the...

Trinity Hosts Living Rosary Event

Trinity Hosts Living Rosary Event

Trinity was honored to welcome The Marian Committee and the community to the 68th Annual Living Rosary, hosted in Steinhauser Gym this past weekend. Children in the community formed the shape of the Rosary on the gym floor, and were joined by hundreds of people in...

Pin It on Pinterest